Project Journal: Victorian Women’s Tailoring Part IX: 1903 Gallery

Well, we just got to see my 1883 tailoring project. Now let’s enjoy taking a mental stroll with my 1903 tailored look! Again, there are lots of pictures to see!

1903: Wool jacket and skirt trimmed with cotton velvet. Velvet covered buckram Hat.
1903 Skirt and Jacket
1903 Skirt and Jacket
1903 Skirt and Jacket
1903 Blouse
1903 Skirt and Blouse
1903 Undergarments: Corset Cover and Petticoat
1903 Undergarments
1903 Corset Cover
1903 Undergarments: Combination and Corset
1903 Corset
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10 thoughts on “Project Journal: Victorian Women’s Tailoring Part IX: 1903 Gallery

  1. Oh Wow! This is just what I have been looking for! I portray a woman who lived in the area where I now live, between @1870 to 1907. The house she lived in is being restored as a living museum and the board has picked 1903 as “The Year” at least as far as finishings go. It has been difficult for me to find fashions specific to 1903. I just had to send this comment off before I even look at the rest of your posts. THANK YOU!!!!

    elizabeth

    1. I’m so glad to hear your interest in that period! You should look at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Collection for images. You might also consider buying or borrowing Dover books on historic costume. They have wonderful reference books full of catalog and fashion plate images throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. You can find many of them on Amazon. Best!

  2. Do you have a pattern for this or did you make your own? I especially love the petticoat, the lace detail is awesome! Is there some padding to get this effect under the skirt?

    1. I made my own patterns for these garments. You can read more about my sources for inspiration and patterning in this post: https://quinnmburgess.wordpress.com/2011/02/07/project-journal-womens-tailoring-part-ii/
      The petticoat is pretty spectacular. I really do enjoy the small details like that. 🙂 Thanks for the compliment! The s shape is achieved in the rear with a stuffed pillow like bum pad, but I also have also used a bum pad made of rows of gathered lace sewn onto a fabric foundation to create a similar look that is a little less pronounced. Thanks for reading and commenting!

  3. What is the circumference of the bum pad at its thickest point. I have one, but I don’t know if it is too big for this usage. Thanks so much for answering all of my questions!

    1. The bum pad is a crescent shape (or another way to describe it is a half circle with the straight side hollowed out so it fits around the curve of a person’s back). When stuffed, it is 12″ across its widest point and 6″ deep at the inside of the curve (with the curve of the sides the whole depth is 8″). Stuffed, the bum pad is 3″ thick. Mine is well stuffed but not still squishy. At the center point the circumference is 17″. Thanks for asking all the questions!

      1. Well, Mine’s not too big. It is actually rather small. 10 inches across at the outside, 4 inches across the inside and just less than 12 inches circumference. I got it as an add on to a “bustle” two piece ensemble through e-bay. What material is your bum pad made of and what is it stuffed with?

        I would like to send a picture of me in the outfit if possible. I have realized since the picture was taken that the hat I’m wearing is the wrong era. Would sending it to the above address work? That is if you would like to see it. You might not as it was not made by me.

        Again thanks for the time you are taking to answer my questions!

  4. I’ve loved reading your posts and the fun you have making your clothes, and of course the fun you have wearing them.
    I just have to say that I have fallen in love with your petticoat worn with this outfit. It is so beautiful, no wonder you kept on showing it off on your photoshoot 🙂

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