HSF #26: Curtain Along Jacket, Finally!

The theme of the final HSF challenge of 2013 is “Celebrate”:

Make something that is celebration worthy, make something that celebrates the new skills you have learned this year, or just make something simple that celebrates the fact that you survived HSF ’13!

This challenge gave me the inspiration to finally finish my Mineral Felicite jacket!

Here’s the story… I bought the fabric over a year ago, but didn’t really start thinking about the project until this summer. I made a mock-up of my chosen 1760s pattern and thought I’d sorted out the fitting issues, but after I’d cut and sewn the real fabric I had many more unexpected problems! I was discouraged, but recieved some really wonderful opinions about what I should do to proceed from you lovely readers. I decided to go with a stomacher front jacket with self fabric pleated trim around the neckline/front opening and around the cuffs on the sleeves, like this jacket at the Met. Then, back in September, the HSF inspired me to make a stomacher to match my jacket for challenge #19. After that, my jacket languished, because I really wasn’t very excited about finishing the sewing for the other decisions I’d made and the alterations that needed to be done to make the jacket the way I wanted it. But I really wanted to finish the jacket in this calendar year. And that brings us to the present, with the jacket finally completed. Yay! I am SO ready to celebrate that this jacket is finally done!!!

IMG_7431

Front. The pleated trim easily hides the pins used to attach the stomacher!

IMG_7432

Back. It’s wrinkly and without a waist on the hanger. You’ll just have to believe that it looks better on a body!

The facts:

Fabric: Almost 2 yds Waverly Mineral Felicite printed cotton and 1yd (I think) peach linen

Pattern: Heavily altered, but I started with the 1760-1790 jacket pattern in Janet Arnold.

Year: Well… 1760s is what I was aiming for in the beginning.

Notions: Thread and cane boning.

How historically accurate?: 60%. This definitely falls in the historic costume category of my wardrobe. The Waverly fabric is in the spirit of the 18th century, but not accurate, though the linen is accurate as are the methods of construction. The trim is based on extant garments but not specifically reproduced. The jacket is 100% hand sewn.

Hours to complete: So many! With all the problems and alterations and re-sewing I completely lost count.

First worn: Has not been worn yet.

Total cost: $30 maybe? I don’t remember exactly what I paid for the fabrics.

Hopefully, I’ll get some more pieces of an 18th century ensemble done at some point and get pictures of the jacket on me. Don’t hold your breath, though, it could be awhile!

Advertisements

About quinnmburgess

Quinn M. Burgess creates reproduction and costume historic clothing. Her inspiration has a strong foundation in history: historic dress, social history, and material history. With the addition of clothing construction knowledge, her passions converge in an imaginative world of creative history that she loves to share with others.
This entry was posted in 1760s, 18th Century, Costume Construction, Curtain-Along, Historical Sew Fortnightly, Trimmings and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to HSF #26: Curtain Along Jacket, Finally!

  1. Helen Fratena says:

    You are do persistent, and that is inspirational. I, too, have a project that needs re-doing, but I haven’t attempted it yet, because I don’t really know where to begin the alterations. I did a 1912 era corset, did the mock up, altered, mock up, altered and then sewed my real fabric. I trimmed with some lace, rose trim, with hand embroidered leaves. I am very pleased with the way it looks, but not the way it fits. The top folds down under my “girls”, not flattens them for that boyish, slender look. At some point I will tackle a re-do. Just not now. I need a success to give me a battery re-charge.

    Thanks for sharing that you, too, have projects that don’t turn out the first time. Inspirational

    • Oh, I absolutely have projects that require reworks! I’m glad to share my failures and ask for help… sometimes! 🙂 I hope you have time to let your project sit and the inspiration to fix it in the future.

  2. Aubry says:

    Such a lovely jacket! I’m glad you finished it despite all the trouble. It turned out beautifully in the end!

  3. Caroline says:

    This turned out beautifully! I love the trim!

  4. Gina White says:

    Oooh! I really like the colors of your jacket! It is light and very delicate looking! Now where to find a picture of you wearing it? 😉

    Blessings!
    Gina

  5. It looks great! I love the fabric! Can’t wait to see a picture of it on so I can see what it really looks like!

  6. Jen Thompson says:

    *squee!* It turned out SO GOOD! Those colors are absolutely dreamy.

  7. Yay! Thanks for the lovely comments, everyone. 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s