HSF #15: 18th Century Bum Roll

When I posted about my new apricot 18th century petticoat, I also mentioned that there was a sneak peak at my new bum roll in the pictures. Remember? The bum roll fulfills the HSF #15 Challenge: White. It’s a rather simple accessory, so there’s not a whole lot to say about it.

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Ooo… A white bum roll!

The facts:

Fabric: About 10″ white striped cotton

Pattern: None, the bum roll is just a rectangle that’s gathered at the sides and tapered a little toward the front points.

Year: Loosely 1700-1780.

Notions: Thread, poly fill, 1/4″ white cotton tape for ties.

How historically accurate?: I give it 80%. Bum pads/rolls in the 18th century were probably not made of cotton or stuffed with poly fill. But the shape achieves the desired silhouette and is in the vein of research I have seen on 18th century bum rolls.

Hours to complete: 1

First worn: Well, Squishy wore it for pictures!

Total cost: The fabric was $1 a yard, so about 30 cents.

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The gathers are what creates the crescent shape. It pulls in to be a tighter curve when tied around the body as well.

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About quinnmburgess

Quinn M. Burgess creates reproduction and costume historic clothing. Her inspiration has a strong foundation in history: historic dress, social history, and material history. With the addition of clothing construction knowledge, her passions converge in an imaginative world of creative history that she loves to share with others.
This entry was posted in 18th Century, Accessories, Costume Construction, Undergarments and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to HSF #15: 18th Century Bum Roll

  1. I love how the White challenge lends itself easily to underwear!
    And interesting about the gathers.

  2. Pingback: 1630s Underthings – A simple bum roll – Sewing Empire

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