1934 Metallic Evening Gown

Of all the changing styles of women’s clothing in the 1930s, I am most drawn to those near 1933. This dress is no exception, though I’m putting its date at 1934. I designed, patterned, and built this dress for a short film four years ago, but it was never used and has been languishing ever since. So when I had an opportunity to wear 1930s evening wear last year I brought it out. Why not give something a wear that was entirely finished but had never been worn?

The dress is a classic 1930s bias cut gown. It has a wide ruffle around the neckline and applied godets on the skirt at about knee height. The dramatic back view shows off these details best. The inspiration came from this dress dated 1934 and this one dated 1933. I’ve accessorized it with sparkle drop earrings, a clear gem bracelet, and my black American Duchess Seabury shoes.

The dress is made from a metallic gold and navy shot fabric. I loved the metallic but hoped that it would drape more fluidly than it does in actuality. The neck ruffle and bias sash are both made from navy polyester charmeuse. The dress has a full lining of the navy charmeuse.

For not being made for me, it fits pretty well. It’s a smidge short and not perfect in the front torso, but I think the metallic fabric distracts pretty well! Plus, you really can’t tell if I only show you back views… The back is my favorite part!

 

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About thequintessentialclothespen

The Quintessential Clothes Pen creates historical clothing and accessories as well as modern garments.
This entry was posted in 1930s, 20th Century, Wearing Reproduction Clothing. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to 1934 Metallic Evening Gown

  1. Very stylish. Love your creativity, Quinn. ~ Love you, Mom

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