An 1890s Outing To Save A Munbax

It’s been awfully quiet here on the blog for awhile. Life has been busy, but the real reason for my lack of posts is that I upgraded my computer. That’s a good thing overall, but it has created multiple issues with storing/moving/accessing my photos as well as needing a new program to edit/watermark/organize them and I’ve only recently found a solution that fits my workflow and needs.

I’ve been sitting on these photos from an event in 2018, thinking that they would be fun to share, but never actually getting to it. But now is the time!  Save The Munbax was a live, interactive game created by Green Door Labs that created a magical, wizarding world set in the 1890s. As guests, we solved puzzles, interacted with magical plants and potions in classes, and followed different trails to attempt to save the rare Northern Crested Dimmoth Munbax from extinction. You can read more about Save The Munbax here.

Since this fantastic world was set in the 1890s, I decided to give my 1899 Elusive Blue Gown a night out of the closet. With no dancing involved it was a great opportunity to wear the trained skirt!

I wanted to make my 1890s outfit a bit more magical and quirky, so I pulled a few accessories together that aren’t my usual for an 1890s dress. For one thing, I wore my subtle-Harry-Potter time-turner necklace, picked up on my trip to trip the Wizarding World Of Harry Potter at Universal Studios in 2018.

I also wore my 1811 Turban Fillet instead of my usual feathers and sparkly hair accessories. Despite not being made to match my 1899 dress, it is actually made from the same fabric since I have an 1811 evening gown made from this elusive blue fabric.


The final bit of quirk was my shoes. I thought silly shoes would be fun, so I wore my 1814 Vernet shoes. The turned up toes and fur weren’t really visible, but I enjoyed knowing that they were there.

I attended this event with Plaid Petticoats, who was also dressed up in her 1890s best, including a cape!

We had fun exploring the different rooms, solving the puzzles, and exclaiming at different oddities.

We enjoyed the floating candles in the stairwell and used them as a backdrop for some our photos and also to give my pygmy puff a subtle chance to pop out of my reticule.

In the end, the guests were able to solve the mysteries necessary to save the Munbax and we were even rewarded with a glimpse of one!

2 thoughts on “An 1890s Outing To Save A Munbax

  1. Dear Quinn,
    Ooh, an evening in an 1890s magical school, to save what appears to be a carnivorous bird? Sign me up. Had a glimpse of the Green Door Save the Munbax page and the entire evening looks like it’s beautifully dreamed up and cast. No wonder you wanted to blog about it.

    The elusive blue in the dress is so pretty on you, and the dress itself could work for history bounding for a night out at a formal concert, don’t you think? Good call on the coiffure, too. 1890s coiffures can be rather spiky and in your face, or dull, and you avoided both.

    Vernet shoes! That brought back memories of all of our projects, and through links I found Jenni’s shoes. I hope to see her soon; she is living out in the countryside now and has ducks!

    Glad you’re well. Was on the verge of simply writing in your last post to ask after you and hoping you might see the note: these are not easy times.

    Very best indeed,

    Natalie in KY

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