A Comparison Of Pouf

Last year, I made and wore an 1832 dress to the annual Christmas ball, but was disappointed with the silhouette as I didn’t have the time to make all of the supporting garments to really get it right. This year, I made the supporting garments to fill out last year’s dress so I could get the silhouette just right. Are you as curious as I am to compare the silhouette from one year to the next? Wait no more! (I even managed almost the exact same pose!)

I’m especially pleased with my sleeves! I have to confess that my sleeves were brushing up against things as I wasn’t used to how large they were! It was great! And the skirt is ever so slightly more full as well, which helps to balance the rather enormous sleeves.

I’m also pleased with the subtle difference of having laces on my shoes. Last year, I tried using masking tape to attach the laces inside the shoes, but pressure from walking pulled them right off. This year, I sewed the ribbons to lining of the shoe. That part worked great, but the ribbons would not stay tied and it was rather a challenge to bend over in a corset and tie the bows behind my ankles on a regular basis. It was great for looks but not for practicality!

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About TheQuintessentialClothesPen

The Quintessential Clothes Pen creates historical clothing and accessories as well as modern garments.
This entry was posted in 1830s, 19th Century, Wearing Reproduction Clothing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to A Comparison Of Pouf

  1. Use elastic trim on the shoes. Stays in place, no need to retie!

  2. Gina White says:

    Huzzah for extra puff! I love this era so much and yes, the extra supports so help out with that silhouette! I’m impressed that you were able to get the same pose so perfect!! Wonderfully done!
    Blessings!
    g

  3. Margaret Pearce says:

    Wet your laces and then tie. An old ballet slipper trick.

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